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At Rill Architects we run ArchiCAD on Mac OS X. If you work at Rill, this is your stuff. If you don't, but you work in ArchiCAD, you may find something interesting. Anybody else, I don't know.
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With the advent of graphic overrides, reflected ceiling plans are no longer a wilderness of tracing and weird hacks. What shows: • Walls • Ceiling trim and finishes • Ceiling fixtures including lights, fans, and mechanical fixtures • Floor elements, including deck edges, stairs, counters Using graphic override rules, floor elements are automatically shown dashed in RCP. And, ceiling
Everything I can think of about sections and elevations.
Graphic overrides greatly expand the number of ways an element can represent itself in different kinds of documentation. This means less redundant 'drawing', and more unity. The RCP has long been a frustrating form of output if you're trying to minimize drawing. All the things that need to be shown are modeled, but Archicad has had limited facility to present
Several different kinds of change, which may overlap. New versions mean new workflows, and that means layer changes.
Alphabetical by name of thing. Please suggest improvements and additions. Many things have changed, many have stayed the same. Layer theory hasn't changed much. Current as of Archicad 20, which prompted some layer changes. Big table below the fold.
Beginning with Archicad 20, the fills division of Model View Options is obsolete and fills are handled by Graphic Overrides. This enables us to eliminate several combinations that were needed in Archicad 19. Model View Options can be organized into combinations, kind of like layers, and MVO combinations can be saved with views. Naturally, this is all set up in
Updated for Archicad 19. Pen sets let you change the appearance of output at the very last moment - when the drawing, based on the view, is headed out the door. The colors you see while working on the model can be completely different from the published output, and they should be.
Standard pens updated for Archicad 19. The only substantive change since 2007 is that we've dropped pen 170 for structural posts on the story below. This was an ugly hack that's no longer needed since we can use Library Globals to control display of those elements. That's a very small change, but I wanted it to be clear that these
In the old days, things were different. How different depends on how old the days are. It's hard to anticipate every issue you might encounter in an old project. The first question is, what do you need from the project? Do you need drawings, a detail, or are we actually resuming work on the project?
When dimensioning, strive for stunning, perfect, complete, beautiful clarity. I'm serious.
My view of the template is this: Anything you always, or even usually, do on a project should be started in the template. Stories, sections, elevations. Views, lots and lots of views. Not just some layouts, almost all the layouts. You're going to publish PDF and DWG. You're going to print. You're going to do sketch render and BIMx. And
Current naming standards. Still very boring. These rules aren't set in stone, but if we all stay near the rules we all stay near each other. Like all standards, they work most of the time. When a situation is addressed by the standards, you can save your creativity for the projects.
We reviewed some things that people were a little sketchy on. Which libraries should you use • The current version's Archicad Library, which is located in the Applications folder, at Graphisoft/Archicad [n]. When you migrate a project to a newer version, you might also pick up an Archicad [n-1] Migration Library. • The current version's Rill Library, which is located
All the server libraries are in a volume called "2 Libraries", whose icon is a carrot which predates OS X and looks it, and we call the libraries volume the carrot. This is what's there: BIM Server Libraries. Copies of our standard libraries for use in Teamwork projects. Library Container Files. An LCF is a compressed archive of a
Alphabetical by name of thing. Please suggest improvements and additions. Many things have changed, many have stayed the same. Layer theory hasn't changed much. Current as of 16, and I'm not anticipating big differences in 17. Big table below the fold.
Roundup of info on daily shutdown, backup, and power failures.
In Archicad terminology, a marker is a special object that has a subordinate relationship to another element, representing the element and/or saying something about it. Viewpoint markers represent viewpoints in project windows. Each viewpoint type has its own marker objects. There are default markers for each one in the Archicad library, but we (as usual) use customized stuff. Each marker
Model View Options, formerly known as Display Options, can be organized into combinations, kind of like layers, and MVO combinations can be saved with views. Naturally, this is all set up in the templates. MVOs are completely separate from On-screen View Options, which are screen-only and do not affect output. The MVO dialog has three divisions. Options for Construction
The reflected ceiling plan is a universal drawing type that Archicad simply does not handle very well. We took a medium-size step forward in Archicad 11 with addition of the 'Ceiling Plan' model view option for GDL objects. This allows object developers to make objects that draw themselves differently whether the 'Ceiling Plan' or 'Floor Plan' setting is active.
What Shows Note, November 10, 2017: Anywhere you see the layer +C Site Annotation, you can use the layer +C Site Note if the current project doesn't have the annotation layer. (This layer is quite new as of this update.) The difference is not important unless the site is being shared among multiple projects. If the site is shared,