On Land

Environment Information
At Rill Architects we run ArchiCAD on Mac OS X. If you work at Rill, this is your stuff. If you don't, but you work in ArchiCAD, you may find something interesting. Anybody else, I don't know.
RSS
Searched for "ACessentials"

31 Results

Graphic overrides are a new feature of Archicad 20. They allow you to choose elements by criteria, and change their appearance attributes. The changes are grouped into combinations which can be saved with views. Here's how to use Archicad: Build a model, and try to create all the documentation while doing the least amount of non-modeling. If you find yourself
With an assist from Brian Spears and Link Ellis, I figured out that one of my wishes for the mesh tool is already solved. So I thought I would take the opportunity to revise this overview of the tool. The most prominent use for the mesh is site modeling. I cover that in more detail in another post, but you
Sloppy modeling leads to sloppy documentation. That wall that's supposed to be 7'-0" long, but you built it 7'-0 5/64", so it dimensions at 7'-0 1/8", and the published output looks ridiculous. Sloppy modeling doesn't clean up right in plan, section, elevation. (It looks fine in OpenGL with contours off. Great.) That means extraneous lines that either mislead the viewer
These guidelines are current as of Archicad 19.
This is everything I can think of about libraries management. There have been a lot of changes over the years.
If this was a proper post it would be clearer and have some illustrations. These are just my notes on the process, quite involved for us as you'll see, of migrating a project to AC17/18. Even though 17 was released 18 months ago, we still have projects in earlier versions and I doubt we are alone. IMO, the combination of
First, to review: The New Construction renovation filter has these settings: Existing: Override Demolished: Hide New: Show In plan, new walls are gray and existing walls are white. Demolished elements are hidden. When you demolish an opening in an existing wall, the opening disappears and is replaced by a piece of wall whose status is new. I think this behavior
We reviewed some things that people were a little sketchy on. Which libraries should you use • The current version's Archicad Library, which is located in the Applications folder, at Graphisoft/Archicad [n]. When you migrate a project to a newer version, you might also pick up an Archicad [n-1] Migration Library. • The current version's Rill Library, which is located
These guidelines are current as of Archicad 17-18.
Renovation is a feature set to control the display of existing, new, and demolished elements in the workflow of addition and renovation projects. It began in Archicad 15. This feature means we no longer have three of each layer in addition projects. In the Renovation workflow, there are three kinds of elements: Existing Elements, Elements to be Demolished, and New
As of Archicad 16, sea level is part of the new Project Location dialog box. (Options -> Project Preferences -> Project Location) The sea level value is the elevation of project zero in the real world, which is usually the framing floor of the main story of the building (Story 1). This value is entered as a positive number in
Intersection priorities help the user control interactions between certain elements. Wall and beam elements have their own intersection priority; I'm calling that the element priority. Composite skins (and components of custom profiles) have their own intersection priorities. Those are skin priorities. Neither of these should be confused with the intersection group number property of layers, though that bears on intersections
Update: This method works through Archicad 12, with the key Recent Files. In 13 through 15, it still works, but the key you need to modify is called "Recent Documents". In 16, the Recent Documents key disappeared. Unfortunately I haven't been able to find where the recent documents are stored in 16 and 17. Also: Under Mavericks (OS X 10.9),
All 3D elements have a User ID, known simply as the 'ID'. It can be observed and edited in the Info Box (near the top in our setup) and in the Settings dialog under the Listing And Labeling division. The only 2D element with an ID is the Fill. I wish other 2D elements had IDs. Then I could 'name'
Or, seen and not seen. Fills, white pens, and materials.
A reference marker is a special object that can intelligently refer to viewpoints within the project or drawings placed on layouts. They also create viewpoints, which is a strange kind of double duty. Then you can also create viewpoints without markers... it's not intuitive overall. For most cases, you can think of a viewpoint as an application window. Sections, elevations,
Isn't north up? Probably not. Since the orientation of the project is driven by the geometry of the plan, north can be any which way. In the Sun dialog The north direction for the project is set in the Sun dialog. You get there via the Sun button in the Camera settings box, or via the More Sun button in
Every viewpoint has a name and an ID. The name is important and is often used for output. The ID is never used for output, but wherever possible we use the ID to help organize the project map and view map. For viewpoints with with a marker, the name and ID appear in the Info Box and settings dialog. This
The Drawing Manager appeared in Archicad 10, taking the place of Drawing Usage in PlotMaker 9. You can open it by clicking the button at the upper left of the Navigator. It lists every drawing placed in the project, displays various settings of the drawings, and offers tools for performing drawing-related tasks such as updating, changing the linked view, breaking
In which I tilt at the windmill of Floor Plan Cut Plane, Relative Floor Plan Range, Automatic show-on-story, projection... It's not pretty. I mean, it's so pretty! You should read it! This is some of the stuff I was keeping from you when we discussed roofs in plan.